My mistress eyes sonnet. Sonnet 130: Section I (Lines 1 2019-01-29

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Analysis of Sonnet 130 by William Shakespeare

my mistress eyes sonnet

Lines 7-8 And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. Shakespeare wants readers to really think about what is being said in this poem. In telling his mistress that he loves her, our speaker also has to give us an idea about what his love is like. He doesn't need perfection in order to love. We just learned that she has darkish dun skin line 3. Maybe the best way to tell someone you love him or her in a poem is to be simple, honest and straightforward.

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Shakespeare Sonnet 130: My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun

my mistress eyes sonnet

Is this really what a person is supposed to sound like when he professes his love? That kind of flattery doesn't improve anything. Analysis: Sex Rating Exactly how steamy is this poem? While we're on the subject of appearance, we should point out that there is a definite racial side to this talk about beauty. It manages to both stop and start and to flow along beautifully, just like an almost-silent, watchful cat dashing from place to place. If you compare the stanzas of Astrophel and Stella to Sonnet 130, you will see exactly what elements of the conventional love sonnet Shakespeare is light-heartedly mocking. Or do you think that love requires the kind of flattering little lies that the speaker refuses to tell? If you compare the stanzas of Astrophel and Stella to Sonnet 130, you will see exactly what elements of the conventional love sonnet Shakespeare is light-heartedly mocking. This poem is all about female beauty and our expectations and stereotypes about the way women ought to look. They all fit into a very narrow definition of what is beautiful.

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Sonnet 130: My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun

my mistress eyes sonnet

It is not easy to account for this, since the Chandos Portraitportrait is certainly not the first in point of genuineness, whatever may be its degree of artistic merit. The speaker gives us this list of evidence, and really digs into the details. Just listen to the way these lines stop and start. Page abides by includes, picking four consecutive lines in a poem that she admires. If you really wanted to seem like a smart, cool guy, you'd toss in a few mythological allusions.

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SparkNotes: Shakespeare’s Sonnets: Sonnet 130

my mistress eyes sonnet

This is a long time before mouthwash. Lines 7-8 And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. The speaker lets us know that his lover doesn't come close to that spooky ideal. This is true love which overcomes the decay of age and the test of time. There are lots of different themes in Shakespeare's sonnets, but they share this playful and sweet tone. To the same extent that many romantic poets exaggerate the beauty of their mistresses, insisting that their eyes are more beautiful than the sun, their hair fairer than hold or their cheeks redder than roses, Shakespeare decides to exaggerate how unattractive his mistress is. In the first quatrain, the speaker spends one line on each comparison between his mistress and something else the sun, coral, snow, and wires—the one positive thing in the whole poem some part of his mistress is like.

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Sonnet 130: Section I (Lines 1

my mistress eyes sonnet

A metrical foot consisting of one unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable is called an iambus; a foot composed of a stressed syllable followed by an unstressed syllable is called a trochee; and a foot composed of two unstressed syllables followed by a stressed syllable is called an anapest. We wouldn't really expect them to be, would we? I love to hear her speak, yet well I knowThat music hath a far more pleasing sound;I grant I never saw a goddess go;My mistress when she walks treads on the ground. Her Cheeks Symbol Analysis If the ideal woman in Shakespeare's time was supposed to have skin as white as snow and smooth and blond hair, then her cheeks are probably going to have to be pink and rosy too. By ignoring the playful nature of those exaggerated comparisons, our speaker ends up being the one who sounds like he isn't getting the joke. Dun is a word often used to describe the color of a horse, and definitely not the kind of thing a woman would be thrilled to hear about her breasts.

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Sonnet 130: My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun

my mistress eyes sonnet

Metaphors compare two unlike things by directly calling one thing the other, which shows strength and meaning, or how important that phrase is. Scholars have attempted to illustrate the difference of tone between them by stating that the Fair Youth sequence refers to spiritual love, while the Dark Lady sequence refers to sexual passion. What if the speaker started out by telling the girl he loves her, only then going on to the negative points?. In 'To His Coy Mistress' the man… requirements and rules of a glosa that P. Now, don't get us wrong, we're not anti-love poetry and we can get into the sappy stuff sometimes too. I have seen roses damasked, red and white, But no such roses see I in her cheeks; And in some perfumes is there more delight Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. Readers in Shakespeare's time would have recognized all these worn-out comparisons as allusions to images in other love poems.

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Read Shakespeare's 130.” My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red,

my mistress eyes sonnet

Skin that is literally as white a snow would probably be scary. Famous examples of traditional love sonnets include the poems of Petrarch, an Italian poet from the 14th century. Anyway, before we proceed to our analysis of this divisive poem, here is Sonnet 130. The iron spikes reinforce this delineation, drawing in thought with respect to the gathering 's merciless judgements and reformatory character. Old love poems bring to mind flowery language and the kind of unrealistic glop that you could never bring yourself to say with a straight face.

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Sonnet 130: My Mistress' Eyes Are Nothing Like The Sun Poem by William Shakespeare

my mistress eyes sonnet

William Shakespeare was born on April 23, 1564, in Stratford-upon-Avon. Your girlfriend would suddenly become Venus or Helen or Diana. This woman's skin isn't white, or even cream colored. Imagery is a poetic device that employs the five senses to create an image in the mind of the reader. Satire Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 also uses satire as a literary device.


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