Mintzberg 1989. Visionary leadership and strategic management 2019-02-28

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Visionary leadership and strategic management

mintzberg 1989

At lower levels in the hierarchy, the problem becomes more severe because planning has often been used to exercise blatant control over business managers. In this role, you're responsible for transmitting information about your organization and its goals to the people outside it. And how can we call management a profession if we cannot specify what managers are to learn? Real strategists get their hands dirty digging for ideas, and real strategies are built from the occasional nuggets they uncover. Sitting in a manager's office and writing down what he did all day just didn't seem quite right. But a look at how managers actually process information reveals a very different picture. Divisionalized Form Large organizations with diversified products create divisions to handle related activities. The manager can be defined as that person in charge of an organization or one of its subunits.

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Mintzberg's Management Roles

mintzberg 1989

The ways in which we try to control our organization and our organization in return try to control us become major issues in the lives of all of us. Objectives have to be restated and budgets reworked, and policies and standard operating procedures reconsidered, to take into account the consequences of the specific changes. In orientation and tone, as well as in some of its central content, this article really set the pattern for my subsequent work. Disseminator To be a good disseminator you need to know how to share information and outside views effectively, which means that good communication skills are vital. First is the figurehead role.

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Mintzberg on Management: Inside Our Strange World of Organizations by Henry Mintzberg

mintzberg 1989

Its key characteristics are direct supervision of subordinates, organic organization according to functions and a lack of formal support structures. I agree that communication is a huge part of the job — managers spend 50 per cent of their time in some cases on communication. But even now, few people fully understand the reason: strategic planning is not strategic thinking. Their performance depends on how well they understand and respond to the pressures and dilemmas of the job. There's nothing rigorous about most of this research, a lot of it's nonsense, but in the sense of academic journals it is rigorous with fancy hypotheses, tested in all kinds of ways, which never, or rarely, bring any insight. Its characteristics include a lack of formal structure combined with a variety of highly skilled employees.


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Articles

mintzberg 1989

By retaining this power, the manager can ensure that decisions are interrelated -- all must pass through a single brain. As a result, he or she can neither disseminate the information subordinates need nor make decisions that adequately reflect external conditions. The changed system also exhibits radical novelty such as new properties or coherence ; stable system interactions; dynamic wholeness that is always changing; and downward causation as the system shapes the behavior of its parts. He is currently the Cleghorn Professor of Management Studies at the Desautels Faculty of Management of McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where he has been teaching since 1968, after earning his Master's degree in Management and Ph. Through all the false starts and excessive rhetoric, we have learned what planning is not and what it cannot do.

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Mintzberg on Management: Inside Our Strange World of Organizations

mintzberg 1989

You might also want to read our article on — this technique can help you prepare for difficult negotiations. The Fallacies of Strategic Planning An expert has been defined as someone who avoids the many pitfalls on his or her way to the grand fallacy. All of this poses questions for business education. Above all, this person programs intended strategies and sees to it that they are communicated clearly. Package them neatly so that we can tell everyone about them and get things going.

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Henry Mintzberg on leadership vs management

mintzberg 1989

These are not people who abstract themselves from the daily details; they are the ones who immerse themselves in them while being able to abstract the strategic messages from them. Organizations disenchanted with strategic planning should not get rid of their planners or conclude that there is no need for programming. The parts in the system are self-organized. He answers questions such as how do organizations function and structure themselves? The impact is that the organization is not aligned with itself. In other words, yesterday you were an engineer, today you're managing engineers so you're no longer doing engineering, so how do you face that? The traditional literature notwithstanding, the job of managing does not breed reflective planners; the manager is a real-time responder to stimuli, an individual who is conditioned by his or her job to prefer live to delayed action. All the promises about artificial intelligence, expert systems, and the like improving if not replacing human intuition never materialized at the strategy level.

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Mintzberg's Management Roles

mintzberg 1989

But how many organizations are so blessed? Then watch what they do. The second is less conventional but present nonetheless in many organizations. An important message of change management literature is that organization change is not fixed or linear in nature but contains an important emergent element as identified in complexity theory. When companies understand the difference between planning and strategic thinking, they can get back to what the strategy-making process should be: capturing what the manager learns from all sources both the soft insights from his or her personal experiences and the experiences of others throughout the organization and the hard data from market research and the like and then synthesizing that learning into a vision of the direction that the business should pursue. Systems have never been able to reproduce the synthesis created by the genius entrepreneur or even the ordinary competent strategist, and they likely never will. Thus the first step in providing the manager with some help is to find out what his or her job really is. The plans of the chief executives I studied seemed to exist only in their heads -- as flexible, but often specific, intentions.

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Mintzberg on Management

mintzberg 1989

This failure is why formal planning has promoted strategies that are extrapolated from the past or copied from others. They have critical roles to play alongside line managers, but not as conventionally conceived. In large part, communication is his or her work. Written plans inform financiers, suppliers, government agencies, and others about the intentions of the organization so that these groups can help it achieve its plans. I've been collecting material for 15 years or so, on getting past Adam Smith and Karl Marx towards a balanced society. We have also learned how the literature of management can get carried away and, more important, about the appropriate place for analysis in organizations.

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Henry Mintzberg

mintzberg 1989

In the monitor role, the president is constantly on the lookout for new ideas; when a good one appears, he or she initiates, in the context of the entrepreneur role, a development project that he or she may supervise or else delegate to an employee perhaps with the stipulation that the manager must approve the final proposal. The result is Type A decentralization. While certainly not dead, strategic planning has long since fallen from its pedestal. Take the example of the Polaroid camera. We try things, and those experiments that work converge gradually into viable patterns that become strategies.

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The Fall and Rise of Strategic Planning

mintzberg 1989

Planners should make their greatest contribution around the strategy-making process rather than inside it. For the last Hundred years, was the dominant social ideology. As monitor, the manager perpetually scans his or her environment for information, interrogates liaison contacts and subordinates, and receives unsolicited information, much of it as a result of the network of personal contacts he or she has developed. Homans explains how, because they were at the center of the information flow in their own gangs and were also in close touch with other gang leaders, street gang leaders were better informed than any of their followers. As the saying goes, life is larger than our categories. Your rating is more than welcome or share this article via Social media! Revealing how strategy is really formulated, he shows here that successful strategy is rarely, if ever, born in solitary contemplation; rather, the elements usually come together in the heat of battle.

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