Iliad book 24 summary. Iliad Books 21 2019-01-13

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The Iliad by Homer

iliad book 24 summary

Wherefore now stir my heart no more amid my sorrows, lest, old sire, I spare not even thee within the huts, my suppliant though thou art, and so sin against the behest of Zeus. Achilles promises to stay the Achaiansfrom the battle until Hektor's funeral is performed. Therefore, he sends his warrior-companion, Patroklos, to find out who the seriously wounded are. Book 3: Paris challenges Menelaus to a one-on-one duel to decide who gets Helen and to decide which side wins the war. After some heated words, the men reconcile with one another.

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Iliad Summary

iliad book 24 summary

Led by Sarpedon, the Lykians attack the gates,but Telamonian Aias comes over to help defend it and the Lykians cannot breakthrough. The plunder has already been distributed, he argues, and a good man does not take back what he has given. Similarly,when confronting Paris in person she begins by reviling him and suggesting thathe is a coward, but ends up in bed with him. The sons Apollo slew with shafts from his silver bow, being wroth against Niobe, and the daughters the archer Artemis, for that Niobe had matched her with fair-cheeked Leto, saying that the goddess had borne but twain, while herself was mother to many; wherefore they, for all they were but twain, destroyed them all. GradeSaver, 27 August 2000 Web. Achilles weeps for his father and for Patroclus.


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The Iliad Book Summary

iliad book 24 summary

Achilleus then arms himself, andexhorts his horses to bring him safely out of the battle when it is over. At the insistence of Aias, Menelaos sendsAntilochos to get word to Achilleus that Patroklos' corpse is in danger ofbeing dragged away by the Trojans. She drops Aeneas, but Apollo bears him away. Finally, the exhausted old king asks if Achilles can provide a bed for him to sleep in. Howbeit as thy guide would I go even unto glorious Argos, attending thee with kindly care in a swift ship or on foot; nor would any man make light of thy guide and set upon thee. He accepts the ransom and agrees to give the corpse back.

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Poem Summary

iliad book 24 summary

Hermes reveals his true identity as Priam is about to enter Achilles' dwelling, but he leaves Priam to meet with Achilles alone. For the sake of the two royal brothers, the Argives bloody their hands against men who have done them no wrong. These then loosed from beneath the yoke the horses and mules, and led within the herald, the crier of the old king, and set him on a chair; and from the wain of goodly felloes they took the countless ransom for Hector's head. But like a lion the son of Peleus sprang forth from the houses—not alone, for with him went two squires as well, even the warrior Automedon and Alcimus, they that Achilles honoured above all his comrades, after the dead Patroclus. And of gold he weighed out and bare forth talents, ten in all, and two gleaming tripods, and four cauldrons, and a cup exceeding fair, that the men of Thrace had given him when he went thither on an embassage, a great treasure; not even this did the old man spare in his halls, for he was exceeding fain to ransom his dear son.


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The Iliad by Homer

iliad book 24 summary

Book 13: The Greeks defend their ships valiantly as the Trojans slowly near their goal of burning the Greek ships. Losing the struggle, Achilleus appeals to the gods. Then she sate her down beside father Zeus, and Athene gave place. Book 17: Hector removes the armor from Patroclus and puts it on, thus wearing the armor of Achilles. The gods decide to send Priam alone to ransom the body of Hector, creating a situation where the wisest of Trojans will meet with the strongest of the Achaeans, where the father of the slain will meet with the vengeful slayer. The Iliad focuses on events that take place in the tenth year of the Trojan War. The Achaeans all go back to their ships except for the Myrmidons, who, at Achilles' command, mourn Patroclus.

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The Iliad Book 24 Summary

iliad book 24 summary

Priam, overlooking the battlefield from the Trojan ramparts, begs him to come inside, but Hector, having given the overconfident order for the Trojans to camp outside their gates the night before, now feels too ashamed to join them in their retreat. Hektor and Paris return to the battlefield. When Achilleus draws near, Hektor is seized by fear and runs away, withAchilleus close behind. She came to the house of Priam, and found therein clamour and wailing. They feast, and then Odysseus makes the firstof the speeches imploring Achilleus to return.

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The Iliad Book 20 Summary

iliad book 24 summary

Zeus is anxious because his wife, Hera, queen of the gods, despises the Trojans and will be furious with him. Achilleus agrees, but as he attempts to hug Patroklos the ghostslips away. When he returns to his house, where all the gods are assembled, Hera is waiting in anger for him. He counsels the Achaians to return home, as he himself intends to do the next day. The men return to the front, where Achilles is still withdrawn into his ship, refusing to fight. Over theprotestations of Hekabe, Priam prepares to enter the Greek camp.

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The Iliad, Book 24: Achilles and Priam

iliad book 24 summary

Some commentators characterize Hector as a selfless defender of his people and Achilles as a brutal killing machine. Say unto him that the gods are angered with him, and that I above all immortals am filled with wrath, for that in the fury of his heart he holdeth Hector at the beaked ships and gave him not back, if so be he may be seized with fear of me and give Hector back. Book 3: Summary: As the armies move to meet each other, Paris strides forward ahead of the Trojan ranks, by this move challenging the best of the Argives to face him in combat. Here the poet reminds us of Paris's fateful judgment in Olympian Idol. The battle rages on,until Diomedes sees Hektor rushing upon the Greeks with Ares at his side, andthe Achaians retreat a bit. They send down Athena to make sure that the truce does not hold.

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