Homage to my hips analysis. “Homage to my Hips” (Poem/Analysis) 2019-01-12

Homage to my hips analysis Rating: 9,2/10 905 reviews

Lucille Clifton

homage to my hips analysis

She chose to rebel against the rules created for her physically, ethnically, or sexually. Michael: A while ago, you told me that someone had mumbled that you had played the race card when you read the poem about James Byrd, the black man who was dragged to his death by the truck in Texas. In the second half of line 5, Clifton attaches the notion of freedom to her hips. Clifton lost her daughter Frederica to a brain tumor in 2000 and her son Channing to heart failure in 2004. She also speaks of her hips as if they have existence independent from her.

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Short Summary of “Homage to My Hips” by Lucille Clifton

homage to my hips analysis

But in this stanza, she talks about something in the future. Clifton takes a stand for her ethnicity in the next lines of her poem. Now who else sounds like that, I don't really know. It was when she attended Fredonia State Teachers College that she was experimenting and exploring poetry, drama, and other various things that went on to shape her writing. That's what I'm going to do. Even though at the time society believed women should not be so forward, Clifton did not agree. By 1966, the tenor of the civil rights movement began to change.

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homage to my hips analysis

homage to my hips analysis

Michael: You have come through cancer and chemotherapy, kidney failure, dialysis, kidney transplant—you've been looking at death for five years. Cited: Sarah Brooks, The thoughts of a woman biography Clifton, homage to my hips Hudson, Theodore, and B. The second and third lines of this poem modify the first, making the speaker's hips physically and metaphorically big. He told me that he was grateful that when I mention when I was first published, I always said it was in Negro Digest. The reference to magic suggests that Clifton may be referring to juju, the magic of an object or fetish believed by West Africans to hold supernatural power. She has pride in them, as for herself.

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Sunday Poetry: Homage to My Hips, by Lucille Clifton « Gone Mild

homage to my hips analysis

In addition, the synecdoche is clear for the two important reasons noted above: first, hips are an essential part of a woman's body, and second, hips are directly related to the topic under discussion, a woman's beauty and sense of self. She is comfortable and lazy in her age, now living out her days sleeping. Good Woman: New and Selected Poems was published in 1987. My husband died at 49. You know, I have seen other.

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homage to my hips: Lines 1

homage to my hips analysis

What does your mind fill in when you reach the end of that line? Sexuality is also a point in this poem. She remarks on the pettiness and arrowness imposed by patriarchal and societal expectations of women. Rather, it becomes clear that their position of privilege has been maintained only through the acquiescence of those who accept their power. There are many ways that express the poet intentions and how it fits together. If you bear witness, you remain rooted in some way. She uses word choice and personification to describe how she will not back down from her beliefs on how she should live her own life.

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Brief Analysis of to My

homage to my hips analysis

I didn't know what was meant. So I didn't think it'd fit in the regular bibliography. Likewise Fiction, themes in poetry can also vary from each individual. However, Clifton knows and does not see herself as these models. Lucille seems as if she teases men with her hips. Is it compulsive, are you a missionary in your own way? Because of past failed attempts, success can finally be achieved. Instant mood and confidence boost! I also think that in trying to see things wholly—which I've done all my life, tried to see what is whole—I could see some possible repercusions of some of the things that were said and that happened that were not positive for our race.

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to My Poem Analysis

homage to my hips analysis

She is aware of how they look at her and is not ashamed. She gives off many reasons to why her hips make her modest, but full of pride. As mentioned earlier, her hips are strong, mighty, and can do anything anywhere. Michael: You do an awful lot, Lucille, probably too much: you write regularly, you teach, you give way too many readings, you sit on boards and panels, you serve as a major competition judge once or twice a year. In the second reading, Clifton demands homage to her magical hips, and by extension to her magical body, and by even further extension to the magical bodies of all women of color—and even further, to all women. This is an indication where they lived at the time.

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What Does the Poem to My by Lucille Clifton Mean?

homage to my hips analysis

Brooks was a close personal friend and role model to Clifton. In my family we have some of everything, even a lot of relatives in jail. Clifton speaks in the first person to someone obviously less fortunate than she is. Waniek, Marilyn Nelson, Review of Two-Headed Woman, by Lucille Clifton, in Callaloo, Vol. All of these I feel in the air. I also thought that there had been in history some people who were positive people. Michael: So here's your mother burning her poems, and your context is, this house is always crazy … Lucille: I knew that she was an unhappy woman.

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